3:28 pm - Fri, May 16, 2014
Painting by Tom Christopher, NYC expressionist painter.

Painting by Tom Christopher, NYC expressionist painter.

4:24 pm - Thu, May 1, 2014
1 note
Before and after.

Before and after.

3:27 pm - Wed, Apr 23, 2014
This drawing was done in the courtroom while working on the Marvin vs Marvin “Palimony” case for NBC News.  Michelle Triola Marvin, his girlfriend for 6 years, described earning her keep; at one point she told us of her heroic efforts holding the 6’2” Lee Marvin by his ankles as he drunkenly flailed upside down from a 20th story window in Beverly Hills.  At the proceedings, when Lee Marvin finally noticed us drawing him, he gave the old-finger-scratching-the-forehead salute.  Then a cross-eyed stare.Lee Marvin looked like a guy you did not want to be on the wrong side of. A marine war hero turned actor.  Probably the only guy who could kick Chuck Norris’s butt with one hand while lighting up a Marlborough with the other.  Let’s all hoist one for Lee Marvin. Coolest of the cool.Some quick courtroom facts.In 1979,Lee Marvin was sued by Michelle Triola Marvin, his live-in girlfriend, who legally changed her surname to “Marvin”.  They never married but she went after the money like all real spouses do under California law. She said she suffered a lot. This was dubbed the first  “palimony” case, Marvin v. Marvin, 18 Cal. 3d 660 (1976). In 1979, Lee Marvin was ordered to pay $104,000 to Triola for “rehabilitation purposes” but the court denied her community property claim for one-half of the $3.6 million which Lee Marvin had earned during their six years of cohabitation.  So, in the end, he kind of won. Lee Marvin said that the trial was a “circus” and that “everyone was lying, even I lied.”Drawing courtesy NBC News, Los Angeles, California

This drawing was done in the courtroom while working on the Marvin vs Marvin “Palimony” case for NBC News.  Michelle Triola Marvin, his girlfriend for 6 years, described earning her keep; at one point she told us of her heroic efforts holding the 6’2” Lee Marvin by his ankles as he drunkenly flailed upside down from a 20th story window in Beverly Hills.  At the proceedings, when Lee Marvin finally noticed us drawing him, he gave the old-finger-scratching-the-forehead salute.  Then a cross-eyed stare.

Lee Marvin looked like a guy you did not want to be on the wrong side of. A marine war hero turned actor.  Probably the only guy who could kick Chuck Norris’s butt with one hand while lighting up a Marlborough with the other.  Let’s all hoist one for Lee Marvin. Coolest of the cool.
Some quick courtroom facts.

In 1979,Lee Marvin was sued by Michelle Triola Marvin, his live-in girlfriend, who legally changed her surname to “Marvin”.  They never married but she went after the money like all real spouses do under California law. She said she suffered a lot. This was dubbed the first  “palimony” case, Marvin v. Marvin, 18 Cal. 3d 660 (1976). In 1979, Lee Marvin was ordered to pay $104,000 to Triola for “rehabilitation purposes” but the court denied her community property claim for one-half of the $3.6 million which Lee Marvin had earned during their six years of cohabitation.  So, in the end, he kind of won. Lee Marvin said that the trial was a “circus” and that “everyone was lying, even I lied.”

Drawing courtesy NBC News, Los Angeles, California

3:07 pm - Wed, Apr 16, 2014

Just in this cool ” Monsters That Mean Business”, business card! Received by our local postmaster Anthony, who complained “Get this package out of here.” he said. “It’s giving me a headache.” Ed Roth almost single handedly created the Kustom Kulture decade in Southern California.

His star creation was Rat fink. A smelly, fat rodent surrounded by flies, embellished with a grotesque wrap around tail.  He never did anything. He never said anything. He had only one pose, he was never in a Saturday morning cartoon much less an animated children’s attraction or action ride (aka Disneyland). But we loved him and drew him constantly on our notebook covers.

Big Daddy Roth’s inventive cars like the Beatnik Bandit were made into 1/25th scale models by the prestigious Revell model company. They finally  got word of how Roth dressed. Shabby. His relationship with personal hygiene was at best, casual.
"You’re a role model. You must dress up."  Said Revell to Big Daddy. So he did. He went to a Goodwill bought tux, tails and a high hat. Still slept in his car but did indeed "dress up" when airbrushing tee’s and sweatshirts at the Irwindale National Speedway and local car swap meets.

1:43 pm - Wed, Apr 2, 2014
Mentioned in New York Times article about the history and closing of the Roseland Ballroom.

Mentioned in New York Times article about the history and closing of the Roseland Ballroom.

4:04 pm - Wed, Mar 26, 2014
Exhibit at Galerie Tamenaga in Paris.

Exhibit at Galerie Tamenaga in Paris.

2:21 pm - Thu, Mar 13, 2014
Work in progress.

Work in progress.

2:18 pm - Fri, Mar 7, 2014
2:54 pm - Fri, Feb 14, 2014
1 note
Autumn Light
2013
64 x 96”

Autumn Light
2013
64 x 96”

1:45 pm - Fri, Jan 31, 2014
17 notes
Pause. Let the. Traffic. Flow. 

64x109”

Pause. Let the. Traffic. Flow.

64x109”

2:43 pm - Thu, Jan 23, 2014
3 notes

Recent New York City skyline paintings by Tom Christopher.

3:57 pm - Wed, Jan 22, 2014
2 notes

Stork Club Secrets

My landlord, Mr. Ed, was 99 years old. As far as anyone could tell, he subsisted entirely on cherry red LifeSavers. Most would fall between his armchair, which smelled like a dumpster, and his khakis where they would adhere in a row of sticky red globs. Children and some unkind adults would point fingers and laugh as he plodded down the street to the local C’Town market. He seemed to cotton to me as I found it relaxing to sit and drink Rob Roys while listening to his endless tales. One was about procuring an original Van Gogh painted plate at a movie give-away in the 1930’s. It did not look like a Van Gogh.

The other item he liked to talk about was an ashtray from the Stork Club where he was once a regular. Mr. Ed figured out the owner’s secret sign language as he table hopped around the club. One evening the owner said he could take an ashtray home with him. This story held more interest for me. I coveted said ashtray. In a moment of weakness, and as I clearly was tenant of the month, Mr. Ed sold it to me for $15. As it turns out Stork Club owner Sherman Billingsley did indeed keep control of the action at the club through a series of hand signals to his help. True story. I wonder now about the Van Gogh plate.

2:45 pm
10 notes
A gif showing the progressions of a currently untitled painting.

http://tomchristopher-art.com/

A gif showing the progressions of a currently untitled painting.

http://tomchristopher-art.com/

2:11 pm - Wed, Nov 20, 2013
2 notes

Recent Paintings by Tom Christopher. 

2:04 pm - Fri, Nov 8, 2013
2 notes
A work in progress.

A work in progress.

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